Hugging Trees

Category 5:  Fused and Hugging Trees   Sometimes two trees may grow to large size adjacent to each other and grow together.  These may be of the same species or even trees of two different genera or families.  These consist of two basic forms:  a) Fused - two trees that have become grafted together.  Generally this grafting is between two trees of the same or closely related species or genera. (see Inosculation:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inosculation ) These are also sometime called Conjoined Trees;  and  b) Hugging - two trees that are not grafted together, but are physically touching. rubbing, intertwined, or entangled.  These need to be considered on a case by case basis.  In general the standard height, girth, and crown spread measurements can be made for each individual of the conjoined or hugging pair.
A fusion of a chestnut oak and a white oak. These adjacent trees were not just rubbing and callused but actually fused together. The top of the white oak (smaller stem in the photos) was dead but the grafted section was alive.  Photo by Will Blozan, Winding Stair section, GSMNP.

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldtrips/gsmnp
/hemlock70/hemlock_70.htm

(photo 1 of 2)
A striped maple, a yellow birch, and an eastern hemlock germinated out of the same rotting stump and all have survived. -Jess Riddle

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldtrips/gsmnp
/sugarland/sugarland_mountain.htm

These are clearly three separate trees, but their juxtaposition makes them a candidate for this category in the future should they all survive

Barry Caselli, February 7, 2010:

Pine Barrens in Southern NJ - A Pitch Pine and an Atlantic White Cedar, in a loving embrace!   I saw these trees while on a hike, early last summer.

http://groups.google.com/group/entstrees/browse_thread/
thread/50e7a983b09f0e38?hl=en 

(photo 1 of 2)
Sam Goodwin writes (February 6, 2010):

Northwest Park in Windsor, CT. and calling it a Pinusfagus!  Sam
 
http://groups.google.com/group/entstrees/browse_thread/
thread/af9ae286e533cdb4/461e11d966778615?hl=en&lnk=gst&q=today+in+CT#461e11d966778615
James Parton writes (Feb. 15, 2009):

Bent Creek, NC  - check out  the fused together oak and white pine pictures. Both grew nearly to the same height!
 
http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldtrips/
north_carolina/bent_creek_nc.htm

(photo 1 of 2)
George Fieo (Feb 7, 2010):

Here is a photos of a 12'3" cbh tulip poplar that has encircled a hickory.  I was amazed to see that the hickory was still alive.

http://groups.google.com/group/entstrees/
browse_thread/thread/af9ae286e533cdb4/461e11d966778615?hl=en&lnk=gst&q=today+in+CT

(photo 1 of 2)


Edward Frank (August 8. 2009) writes:

Heart's Content Scenic Area. Allegheny national Forest, PA on the Loop Trail -  a pair of white pine and beech trees that were growing together right beside the trail  

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldtrips/penna/20090808-ogtw/ogfe_teachers_workshop.htm
An eastern white pine and northern red oak growing together  along the Cook Trail at Cook Forest State Park, PA.  photo taken March 15, 2009 by Edward Frank.
Steve Galehouse (February 8, 2010) writes: Here from northern Ohio is a red maple with intertwining stems.

http://groups.google.com/group/entstrees/browse_thread/
thread/a45b5487ff4afd2d?hl=en#
Steve Galehouse (February 8, 2010) writes: Here from northern Ohio is why the forest in my part of Ohio is often called "Beech-maple". From North Chagrin

http://groups.google.com/group/entstrees/browse_thread/
thread/a45b5487ff4afd2d?hl=en#
Michael Davie (February 9, 2010)

Three redwoods at Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, CA. The biggest one is probably about 8 feet in diameter.
   

 

  • Two more hugging trees ENTS, Here's another pair of hugging trees. One is an Atlantic White Cedar. The other I'm not sure about. It's either a swamp maple (red maple) or a Sweet Bay Magnolia. This is about a mile and a half from here. Photos taken the day before yesterday. Barry Caselli  Mar 10, 2010.
  • Multi-trunk tree of different species - Jan 18, 2009
  • Hugging Trees In light of some recent posts I have created a page for "Hugging Trees" on the website: [link] Category 5: Hugging Trees (formerly Conjoined Trees) Sometimes two trees may grow to large size adjacent to each other and grow together. These may be of the same species or even trees of two different genera or families. I am calling these hugging trees. These consist of two basic forms: a) two trees that have become grafted together. Generally this grafting is between two trees of the same or closely related species or genera. b) two trees that are not grafted together, but are physically touching. rubbing, intertwined, or entangled. These need to be considered on a case by case basis. In general the standard height, girth, and crown spread measurements can be made for each individual of the hugging pair.... more Feb 8, 2010. http://groups.google.com/group/entstrees/browse_thread/thread/a45b5487ff4afd2d?hl=en#